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David Lynch on Wild Card Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty hide caption

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Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty

What the reaction to Trump's felony conviction tells us about the word "felon" Jackie Lay hide caption

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Jackie Lay

Should we stop using the word "felon"?

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Michael Bommer and his wife, Anett. Robert LoCascio hide caption

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Robert LoCascio

He has cancer — so he made an AI version of himself for his wife after he dies

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Students listen to their teacher during their first day of transitional kindergarten at Tustin Ranch Elementary School in Tustin, CA, in August 2021. MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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MediaNews Group via Getty Images

COVID funding is ending for schools. What will it mean for students?

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A notable chunk of people say they don't want to vote for either Donald Trump or Joe Biden in November, according to recent polling. Brendan Smialowskijim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowskijim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

The 'double disapprovers' could decide the election. Here's what they have to say

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Putting the immigration "crisis" in historical perspective Jackie Lay hide caption

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Jackie Lay

The 12 jurors who served on former President Trump's hush money trial can choose whether or not to remain anonymous. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

What will life look like for jurors after the Trump trial?

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United States Marines in Afghanistan carry colleague LCPL Jerome Hanley of Massachusetts, who was wounded in an insurgent attack to a waiting medevac helicopter in 2011. Kevin Frayer/AP hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/AP

Battlefield medicine has come a long way. But that progress could be lost

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A display of some of the pre-Columbian antiquities, which comprise the "Repatriation and Its Impact" exhibit at The Parthenon museum in Nashville. The artifacts will be returned to Mexico, when the exhibit concludes. Victoria Metzger/Centennial Park Conservancy hide caption

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Victoria Metzger/Centennial Park Conservancy

How one Nashville museum has embraced the repatriation of stolen artifacts

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Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he arrives with attorney Todd Blanche. Photo by Mark Peterson-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo by Mark Peterson-Pool/Getty Images

Trump was found guilty on all counts. What comes next?

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Former US President and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump returns to the courtroom during his criminal trial at Manhattan Criminal Court in New York City, on May 30, 2024. The jury in Donald Trump's hush money trial announced May 30, 2024 in a note to the court that it has reached a verdict, indicating that this would be delivered in less than an hour. Michael M. Santiago/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

In a historic verdict, Trump found guilty on 34 felony counts in hush money trial

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Baseball catcher Josh Gibson in an undated photo. AP hide caption

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AP

How these newly included MLB stats recognize the legacies of Black players

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Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he arrives for his hush money trial at Manhattan Criminal Court on May 28, 2024 in New York City. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Closing arguments for Trump's trial have been made. What now?

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Hurricane Lee crosses the Atlantic Ocean in 2023. The National Hurricane Center predicts at least 8 hurricanes are expected to form in the Atlantic this year. NOAA via Getty Images hide caption

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NOAA via Getty Images

Forecasters predict another sweltering summer. Are we ready?

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Vehicles travel along I-95 on Friday in Miami. AAA predicts this Memorial Day weekend will be the busiest for travel in nearly two decades. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Make travel bearable on Memorial Day and beyond

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New York Supreme Court Judge Juan Merchan listens as Emil Bove, a member of former President Donald Trump's legal team, argues for his client during Sandoval's hearing. Jane Rosenberg/AP hide caption

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Jane Rosenberg/AP

Here are three possible outcomes in the Trump hush money trial

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Anti-abortion activists who describe themselves as "abolitionists" protest outside a fertility clinic in North Carolina in April 2024. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Anti-abortion hardliners want restrictions to go farther. It could cost Republicans

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Four customers in Florida have filed a federal lawsuit against The Hershey Company alleging that designs displayed on some Reese's Peanut Butter cups were misleading to customers. Plaintiffs v. The Hershey Company hide caption

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Plaintiffs v. The Hershey Company

A child watches others swim at the Emancipation Swimming Pool in Houston on July 19, 2022. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

After years in decline, U.S. drowning deaths are rising again

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