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Britain's Prime Minister Rishi Sunak meets with U.S. President Joe Biden at 10 Downing Street in London, Monday, July 10, 2023. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Could the U.K. election mean an off-ramp from personality politics?

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An American flag flown upside down near the U.S. Capitol. Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images/Getty Images

Conservatives want to burn flags too; plus, the power of a singing POTUS

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What the reaction to Trump's felony conviction tells us about the word "felon" Jackie Lay hide caption

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Jackie Lay

Should we stop using the word "felon"?

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Palestinians walk among the rubble after four hostages were rescued from Gaza in an Israeli rescue operation on Saturday. Anas Baba/NPR hide caption

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Anas Baba/NPR

Can the U.S. force a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas?

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A notable chunk of people say they don't want to vote for either Donald Trump or Joe Biden in November, according to recent polling. Brendan Smialowskijim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowskijim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

The 'double disapprovers' could decide the election. Here's what they have to say

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Artificial Intelligence and Trump on trial. David McNew/AFP; Curtis Means-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/AFP; Curtis Means-Pool/Getty Images

Republicans really want revenge; plus, can AI take a chill pill?

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Putting the immigration "crisis" in historical perspective Jackie Lay hide caption

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Jackie Lay

The 12 jurors who served on former President Trump's hush money trial can choose whether or not to remain anonymous. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

What will life look like for jurors after the Trump trial?

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United States Marines in Afghanistan carry colleague LCPL Jerome Hanley of Massachusetts, who was wounded in an insurgent attack to a waiting medevac helicopter in 2011. Kevin Frayer/AP hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/AP

Battlefield medicine has come a long way. But that progress could be lost

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Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he arrives with attorney Todd Blanche. Photo by Mark Peterson-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo by Mark Peterson-Pool/Getty Images

Trump was found guilty on all counts. What comes next?

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Former US President and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump returns to the courtroom during his criminal trial at Manhattan Criminal Court in New York City, on May 30, 2024. The jury in Donald Trump's hush money trial announced May 30, 2024 in a note to the court that it has reached a verdict, indicating that this would be delivered in less than an hour. Michael M. Santiago/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

In a historic verdict, Trump found guilty on 34 felony counts in hush money trial

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At a march in support of Israel, one woman holds a sign saying, "Christians Stand with Israel." Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he arrives for his hush money trial at Manhattan Criminal Court on May 28, 2024 in New York City. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Closing arguments for Trump's trial have been made. What now?

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Former US President Donald Trump raises his fist as he leaves the courtroom during a break in his criminal trial for allegedly covering up hush money payments at Manhattan Criminal Court in New York City, on May 28, 2024. ANDREW KELLY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANDREW KELLY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Consider This: Who made the most compelling case to jurors in Trump's trial?

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New York Supreme Court Judge Juan Merchan listens as Emil Bove, a member of former President Donald Trump's legal team, argues for his client during Sandoval's hearing. Jane Rosenberg/AP hide caption

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Jane Rosenberg/AP

Here are three possible outcomes in the Trump hush money trial

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Representatives Jasmine Crockett and Marjorie Taylor Greene. Jemal Countess; Drew Angerer/Getty Images; BFA / Warner Bros hide caption

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Jemal Countess; Drew Angerer/Getty Images; BFA / Warner Bros

Anti-abortion activists who describe themselves as "abolitionists" protest outside a fertility clinic in North Carolina in April 2024. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Anti-abortion hardliners want restrictions to go farther. It could cost Republicans

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Ezra Acayan/Getty Images