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British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak speaks during a press conference in London on Monday regarding a treaty between Britain and Rwanda to transfer asylum-seekers to the African country. Toby Melville/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Toby Melville/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

In a file photo from Nov. 6, 2022, California Gov. Gavin Newsom appears at a rally in support of Proposition 1, a state constitutional amendment to guarantee the right to abortion and contraception. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

A voter leaves a voting booth in Concord, N.H., the during primary election on Jan. 23, 2024. Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

How the Founding Fathers' concept of 'Minority Rule' is alive and well today

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Former President Donald Trump looks on at Manhattan criminal court Monday, during his trial for allegedly covering up hush money payments linked to extramarital affairs. Victor J. Blue/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Victor J. Blue/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

The air traffic control tower at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City. Federal regulators are increasing the amount of required rest between shifts for air traffic controllers. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Caitlin Clark, pictured autographing sneakers before the WNBA draft last Monday, is helping drive demand for the league's ticket sales and TV coverage. Adam Hunger/AP hide caption

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Adam Hunger/AP

The U.S.-operated GPS has falsely located planes, people and ships, sometimes placing them at the Beirut's international airport. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

Israel 'spoofs' GPS to deter attacks, but it also throws off planes, ships and apps

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Drug companies often do one-on-one outreach to doctors. A new study finds these meetings with drug reps lead to more prescriptions for cancer patients, but not longer survival. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Hondros/Getty Images

Oncologists' meetings with drug reps don't help cancer patients live longer

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Freedom Monument Park tells honest story of enslaved people

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The latest effort in Congress to force TikTok to be sold is the most serious threat yet to the app's future in the U.S. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

TikTok faces its biggest threat yet; Earth Day tips for sustainable living

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A cheap drug may slow down aging. A study will determine if it works

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A group of volunteers check on homeless people living in a park in Grants Pass, Ore., on March 21. Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP

Supreme Court appears to side with an Oregon city's crackdown on homelessness

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Yufei Zhang of Team China competing during the Tokyo Olympics in 2021. Zhang won four medals in Tokyo including two gold and now is among 23 Chinese swimmers embroiled in a doping scandal. Tom Pennington/Getty Images hide caption

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'Ban them all.' With Paris Games looming, Chinese doping scandal rocks Olympic sport

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Four "American Indicators," people who represent different parts of the economy in different parts of the country, talk about their politics as the presidential election looms. Courtesy of Arch City Defenders, Winton Machine Company, Bhavesh Patel and the Just One Project hide caption

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Courtesy of Arch City Defenders, Winton Machine Company, Bhavesh Patel and the Just One Project

Four 'American Indicators' share their view of the U.S. economy — and their politics

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